Culture and Diversity External Resources

Webinar – Young Children in Refugee Families and Early Childhood Programs: Ways to Mitigate the Effects of Trauma

Young children in refugee families often endure significant direct or indirect trauma from their experiences during conflict, flight, or resettlement. The issue of trauma has gained increasing visibility across the early childhood field, yet relatively little research has explored the specific traumatic experiences and needs of young refugee children or strategies to address them. High-quality early childhood programs can have enormous benefits, particularly for the children of immigrants and refugees. Join this webinar where experts will discuss the effects of trauma on the development of young refugee children, and practical strategies that child-care providers in Canada are using to support the resiliency of refugee children and families.

Promising Practices in Refugee Education

Launched in March 2017, the Promising Practices in Refugee Education initiative set out to identify, document and promote innovative ways to effectively reach refugee children and young people with quality educational opportunities. On their website, you'll find thought-provoking information and ideas, case studies and reports from around the world!

Webinar: Using Loose Parts to Create Culturally Sustainable Environments

A culturally sustainable environment embraces and values the multi-ethnic and multilingual capacities of young children and families. It is how tradition, history, and culture come together to improve the quality of life- culturally, economically, socially, and environmentally. Not just for today, but for future generations to come. A culturally sustainable environment supports children’s development, renews and maintains their humanity to create enduring relationships with nature and with other people in the community and from around the world. In this webinar, you will learn how to use loose parts to design environments that foster culturally sustainability.

Migration Matters: Young Children of Newcomer Families

Drawing from Statistics Canada and research, this edition of Migration Matters summarizes recent trends on the socioeconomic status, education, and mental health of young children of immigrant families. It also provides resources of research and best practices to meet the needs of immigrant children and families.

Multicultural Principles for Early Childhood Leaders

This Head Start resource is divided into 10 chapters, with each chapter presenting one multicultural principle, the research and guidance to support that principle, and questions and/or discussion activities. You can download the individual chapters, or the entire resource here to use for professional learning activities, or for personal professional development here.

Teaching Diversity without the Tourist Approach

One of our greatest strengths in CNC programs is our diversity. Unfortunately, even with our varied backgrounds, caregivers sometimes fall into the trap of teaching children about diversity mainly through special cultural holidays or events. This is referred to as the “tourist approach” because it gives a narrow view of a culture. This article, Teaching Diversity without the Tourist Approach, shares some ideas for how to integrate culture into child care programs in a more holistic way.

Webinar: Trauma Informed Care for Refugees and Children

What are the effects of trauma on immigrant children? How is mental health screening done? What are some options for helping children who have experienced trauma? Recorded in November 2016, this webinar discusses issues that children face when exposed to trauma and helps caregivers learn to respond appropriately.

Breaking the Stigma: Can Children with Special Needs Learn a Second Language?

Some families and professionals believe that it’s too difficult for a child with special needs to learn a second language, but research shows that children with special needs can become bilingual. In a study of children with language impairment, Down syndrome and autism spectrum disorder, researchers confirmed that children’s ability to learn is based on their age, the degree of their disability, their intellectual capacity and their proficiency in their first language.

What does it mean to be culturally competent?

What does cultural competence mean and why is it so important for children to have their culture and cultural backgrounds acknowledged, respected and valued? Underlying cultural competence are the principles of trust, respect for diversity, equity, fairness, and social justice. Read more...

Podcast: Immigrant and Refugee Children in Childcare

In this recording, Julie Dotsch, writer, presenter and trainer for CMAS, discusses research and practices that support refugee children and families. She looks at the importance of keeping traditions alive by integrating them into the new culture as well as the importance of newcomer families maintaining their home languages.