Parenting

200+ activities ideas you can do at home with kids

Many programs across the country are closed in order to slow the spread of COVID-19, and kids are staying home due to the pandemic. Thankfully, learning doesn’t only happen in classrooms. Even while social distancing or self-isolating, children can keep on learning through play, using active games to keep them moving and learning at home. Here is a helpful article and list of over 200 activities ideas you can share with families to help them stay active at home!

Webinar: Everyone Needs Attention – Helping Children Thrive

Attention seeking is seen as misbehaviour in young children, and giving them the attention they need is often interpreted as reinforcement of bad behaviour. This webinar is an opportunity to reflect on how we, as adults must manage our emotions when children seek our attention, include how-to strategies to help the reader reflect on how they sought out attention as children as well as some concrete steps to assist in self-explorations.

Multilingual stories for children

StoryWeaver and Reads have lovely digital collections of multilingual stories for you to share!


Choosing your words carefully…

Changing the way we speak to children is the first step in changing behaviour. When we teach children what to do instead of telling them what NOT to do, behaviour changes and relationships grow. Here's a list of common phrases used with children - along with suggestions for alternatives!


The Magic Triangle of Reading Aloud: The Book, the Child, and the Adult

Children’s picture books are full of joy and learning (phonological awareness, development of pre-reading skills, problem solving, and decoding, just to name a few). In this webinar, participants will learn about the magic that happens when you combine a great book, adult, and child, and how to select great children’s books for young children.


Understanding Children’s Emotions in Extraordinary Times

In this video, Dr. Jean Clinton, a psychiatrist and advocate for children's mental health, speaks with the College of Early Childhood Educators (CECE) to share her expertise in dealing with children's emotions in this extraordinary time. She also talks about ideas, resources and tips to help ease the challenging transition back to on-site work as the pandemic unfolds.


These Books Can Help You Explain Racism and Protest to Your Kids

The conversation about race needs to start early and keep happening, but many parents and caregivers are wondering how to talk about the deaths and unrest with children - and how to keep the important conversations about race and racism going when we’re not in a moment of national outrage.

Books & Tips for Talking With Children About Race

Talking to children about race isn't easy, but it is necessary because racism can thrive when you don’t. Before teaching your children anything, it's important to understand their development level. You have no reason to hide anything from them, but you also don’t have to go into great detail and cause unnecessary stress if it’s beyond their comprehension levels. Read more...

How to Talk to Children About Racism, Prejudice, and Protests – An Age-by-Age Guide

The world has again been shaken by trauma. Many children will be distressed and confused by what they are seeing, hearing, or experiencing. This is the time to have the conversations that can build a more compassionate, kinder humanity, starting with the children close to you. If we want to raise children who celebrate diversity, and who feel empowered to call out injustice and prejudice in all its forms, we have to talk about what’s happening. First though, we have to help them feel safe.

31 Children’s books to support conversations on race, racism and resistance

Research from Harvard University suggests that children as young as three years old, when exposed to racism and prejudice, tend to embrace and accept it, even though they might not understand the feelings. By age 5, white children are strongly biased towards whiteness. To counter this bias, experts recommend acknowledging and naming race and racism with children as early and as often as possible. Children’s books are one of the most effective and practical tools for initiating critical conversations about racism; and they can also be used to model what it means to resist and dismantle oppression.