Child Development

10 Activities to help young children express and label feelings & emotions

Children can have a difficult time understanding their emotions and the way certain events make them feel in the early years of life. As educators, it is our responsibility to help and support them to manage their emerging and often confusing emotions. Here are 10 strategies and 10 activity ideas for helping children express and manage their emotions.

Children take longer to learn two languages at once compared to just one — don’t fret

Some bilingual children from immigrant families develop each language at a slower pace because their learning is spread across two languages. This research shows strong evidence that the rate of language growth is influenced by the number of languages a child is learning - which challenges the belief that children are linguistic sponges who quickly absorb the language or languages they hear and become proficient speakers of both languages!

The ndds Celebrates 25 Years with Rebrand: Now Called “Looksee Checklist”!

In celebration of their 25th anniversary, The Nipissing District Developmental Screening Tool (ndds) has announced a new parent-friendly name and look for their signature developmental checklist. The new Looksee Checklist—reflects the simple, approachable quality of the product to appeal to even more parents and child care professionals. The series of checklists follow a child from 1 month to 6 years of age and provides a short list of yes or no questions about the child’s abilities along with tips to help them grow. The checklists are available in a variety of languages and formats including a redesigned, user-friendly website.

5 Tips for Encouraging Sharing

There has been some debate about encouraging sharing in the early years, and some educators prefer to encourage "taking turns" over "sharing". Either way, it's important for the children in our programs to work on social skills and learn how to share space and objects with their peers. Here are five ideas for teaching and encouraging sharing in your program.

NEW! Newcomer Parent Resource Series: Available in 15 Languages

Refugee parents come to Canada with unique settlement needs, and language barriers that make it challenging to get information to support their parenting, children’s development, and the health and safety of their family here in Canada. We’ve developed a series of 14 parent resources to help - and they’re available in the 14 languages most commonly spoken by refugee families here in Canada!

Why Is My Child Aggressive?

Getting what we want and need is part of survival, but young children often can’t or don’t know how to express their needs and desires in calm ways or using words. As they grow, children learn to control their emotions and interact with others in positive ways. Until that happens, however, young children may be aggressive as they attempt to express themselves. This resource is available in multiple languages for download.

When Your Child Has Nightmares

Young children can’t always tell the difference between dreams and reality. Some children have dreams that feel so “real” and scary that they wake up upset. This can upset parents too and cause everyone to lose sleep. As a parent, there are things you can do to help your child have fewer nightmares so that everyone can sleep better. This resource is available in multiple languages for download.

What Can I Do If My Child Is Aggressive?

Children who are aggressive are often responding to feelings of stress and anxiety in the only way they know how. Your child may need extra help to feel secure. By being loving, calm and patient, you will make a big difference. This resource is available in multiple languages for download.

Sharing Stories With Your Child

Telling stories—whether they are real or imagined—is a fun way to interact with your child. This resource is available in multiple languages for download.

Listening to and Talking With Your Child

Coming to a new country affects your whole family. Taking time to connect with, listen to and talk with your child will help them to feel more secure, and it’s also a lot of fun! This resource is available in multiple languages for download.